Cash Flow Planning for Life - Helping you reach your personal & professional financial goals.

Cash Flow Planning for Life

Helping you reach your personal & professional financial goals.

When will Social Securityyou be eligible to collect your benefits?

Have you reviewed your Social Security Benefits Statement recently? 

What age is going to work best for you to start collecting your benefits – age 62, your full retirement age or age 70?

Nowadays, the subject of planning for your retirement is something that is frequently discussed.

Especially the age you should start collecting your social security benefits. Each expert has their opinion.

Deciding when to begin receiving your benefits can be a complicated decision. A decision that you shouldn’t take lightly.

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Have you put off planning for your retirement because you find it daunting and intimidating? Are you familiar with the “3 Key Plans” you need to have in place to build a solid retirement plan?

Retirement Plan

Visualize yourself on a “three-legged stool”, each leg is a different plan that is vital to your retirement planning. All three legs have one thing in common – all of them need to support you! Each leg must be strong, balanced, and able to support you during your retirement.

So what are the three plans?

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Social Security – 7 Easy Tips

Posted by Mark On June 4th

Do you understand how social security works? Are you planning for your retirement? Do you know when you’ll want to start collecting your social security?

Social Security

The Social Security Act was signed into existence in 1935. At that time, the full retirement age was 65 and life expectancy was only 62. Things have changed. People are living longer, and it’s easy to understand why the social security trust fund is struggling. It is now set up with different retirement ages.

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4: What You Need to Know About Mortgage Interest

Posted by Mark On January 18th

What You Need to Know About Mortgage Interest

This is the fourth installment of Tax Deductions & You: What You Need to Know which can also be downloaded from our free eBook library.

Although most people understand that mortgage interest is deductible, many people may not be aware that there are certain situations in which it actually creates a greater savings not to claim a deduction as mortgage interest.

Under Treasury Regulation 1.163-10T(o) a taxpayer may elect to treat mortgage debt as not secured by a qualified residence.

Once this election is made, it is effective for all subsequent years and can only be revoked with IRS permission. The advantage of this election is if a taxpayer has allowable mortgage interest that is limited by the $1,000,000 or $100,000 rules on indebtedness.

Let’s say you have a home equity loan that is used for a business. The interest deducted on a business return or “Schedule C”, in most cases, will create a greater tax savings than if the interest was deducted as mortgage interest.

Here’s an example:

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What Do You Need to Know About Student Loan Interest?

This is the third installment of Tax Deductions & You: What You Need to Know which can also be downloaded from our free eBook library.

A student loan is designed to help students pay for university or college. It is a calculated amount that should assist with the cost of tuition, books, and living expenses. This loan may differ from other types of loans in that the interest rate may be substantially lower. In addition, the repayment schedule may be deferred while the student is still in education.

Student loan interest is another form of interest that is deductible, but with limitations. These limitations are as follows:

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What You Should Know About Home Equity Loan Interest

This is the second installment of Tax Deductions & You: What You Need to Know which can also be downloaded from our free eBook library.

Any loans that fall under the nondeductible category need to be reviewed along with your cash or equity availability. If possible, they also need to be re-characterized to a deductible form of interest.

An example of this would be having availability on a home equity loan (balance after transfer must be below $100,000) and paying off an auto loan or credit card. This will increase cash flow two fold:

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IRS announces increase in standard mileage rate for business

If you deduct vehicle mileage on your tax return(s), you’ll be happy to know that the IRS has increased the standard mileage rate for business, medical, and moving expenses. The new rate is increased 4.5 cents per mile and it goes into effect for miles driven starting July 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.

I encourage you to update your mileage log/calendar as of June 30, 2011 and record your odometer reading(s) on those vehicles. It would also be helpful to attach an oil change or other maintenance receipt from a third party to back up any mileage reading as of June 30th.

Did you receive notice of this increase in standard mileage rate for business from your current accountant? Does your C.P.A provide you with a free eBook library where you can learn about:

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So you have started looking at how…

your social security benefits will factor into your retirement plan.

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So you’re still a little confused about…

This is the 5th tip in our series entitled “The Nuts & Bolts of Social Security in 7 Easy Tips.”

…your social security planning?

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Social Security is a hot topic these days…

…and if you don’t understand it, it can get pretty confusing!

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